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JCI Curchorem Team 2008

JCI World President Graham Hanlon
JCI BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2008
JCI India World Congress Delegation
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JCI Curchorem Team 2008
President:Jc.Dipti Rampurkar.
Contact no:9822984082,9271428225.
IPP:Jc.Avin Naik.
Contact no:9226985922.
VP Management:Jc.Dr.Mithun Bondre.
Contact no:9823170774
VP Training:Jc.Nita Kudalkar.
Contact no:9823635344.
VP Progroms:Jc.Prajot Naik.
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Secretary:Jc.Reshma Pawar.
Contact no:9923418072.
Treasurer:Jc.Sachin Nagvekar.
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Director Management:Jc.Advt.Pravin Karmali.
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Director Training:Jc.Vidhya Prabhu Dessai.
Contact no:9226991662.
Director Programs:Jc.Franco Rodrigues.
Contact no:9881885252.
Jr.Jc.Chairperson:Jr.Jc.Sudesh Pawar.
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Jctt Chairperson:Jctt Sulaksha Anand Naik.
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Monday, 19-Nov-2007 18:44 Email | Share | | Bookmark
FYBCom Speeches

FYBCom Speeches
FYBA ENGLISH

INDIA’S PRIME MINISTER JAWAHARLAL NEHRU DELIVERS THE EULOGY FOR GANDHI
“In ages to come, centuries and maybe millennia after us, people will think of this generation when this man of God trod on earth.. Let us be worthy of him.”
Known to his loyal Indian followers as the Mahatma (variously translated as “Great Soul” or “Teacher”), Mohandas K. Gandhi spent his lifetime perfecting the techniques of nonviolence and “fasts unto death” to achieve political goals. In 1948, however, he was shot to death by a Hindu extremist who held him responsible for the 1947 partition of India into the nations of India and Pakistan, a partition that Gandhi himself had fought without success.
In the aftermath of Gandhi’s assassination, Jawaharlal Nehru, the Prime Minister of India, stood before the constituent assembly in New Delhi to offer a stirring tribute to the dead leader who had been his lifelong friend. Although their vision of India was not the same- the Mahatma hoped for an agrarian society, Nehru for an industrial nation- the two were united in opposition to British rule.
Nehru’s eulogy for Gandhi, delivered on February 2, 1948, makes extended use of poetic language (“A glory has departed’) and repetition (“All we know is that there was a glory and that it is no more; all we know is that for the moment there is darkness”). In describing the darkness that pervades India at Gandhi’s passing, Nehru acknowledges the widespread feeling of loss and honestly admits, “I do not know when we shall be able to get rid of it.” He does, however, offer the consolation of Gandhi’s enlightenment; throughout the eulogy, in fact, he stresses the imagery of light and darkness to illuminate the loss of “this man of divine fire”.


THE LIGHT HAS GONE OUT
Friends and Comrades, the light has gone out of our lives and there is darkness everywhere. I do not know what to tell you and how to say it. Our beloved leader, Bapu as we called him, the Father of the Nation, is no more. Perhaps I am wrong to say that. Nevertheless, we will not see him again as we have seen him for these many years. We will not run to him for advice and seek solace from him, and that is a terrible blow, not to me only but to millions and millions in this country. And it is a little difficult to soften the blow by any other advice that I or anyone else can give you.
The light has gone out, I said, and yet I was wrong. For the light that shone in this country was no ordinary light. The light that has illumined this country for these many many years will illumine this country for many more years, and a thousand years later, that light will still be seen in this country and the world will see it and it will give solace to innumerable hearts. For that light represented something more than the immediate present; it represented the living, the eternal truths, reminding us of the right path, drawing us from error, taking this ancient country to freedom.
All this has happened when there was So much more for him to do. We could never think that he "'as unnecessary or that he had done his task. But now, particularly, when we are faced with so many difficulties, his not being with us is a blow most terrible to bear.
A madman has put an end to his life, for I can only call him mad who did it and yet there has been enough of poison spread in this country during the past years and months, and this poison has had an effect on people's minds. We must face this poison, we must root out this poison, and we must face all the perils that encompass us, and face them not madly or badly, but rather in the way that our beloved teacher taught us to face them.
The first thing to remember now is that none of us dare misbehave because he is angry. We have to behave like strong and determined people, determined to face all the perils that surround us, determined to carry out the mandate that our great teacher and our great leader has given us, remembering always that if, as I believe, his spirit looks upon us and sees. us, nothing would displease his soul so much as to see that we have indulged in any small behaviour or any violence.
So we must not do that. But that does not mean that we should be weak, but rather that we should, in strength and in unity, face all the troubles that are in front of us. We must hold together, and all our petty troubles and difficulties and conflicts must be ended in the face of this great disaster. A great disaster is a symbol to us to remember all the big things of life and forget the small things of which we have thought too much. In his death he has reminded us of the big things of life, the living truth, and if we remember that, then it will be well with India.......
It was proposed by some friends that Mahatmaji's body should be embalmed for a few days to enable millions of people to pay their last homage to him. But it was his wish, repeatedly expressed, that no such thing should happen, that this should not be done, that he was entirely opposed to any embalming of his body, and so we decided that we must follow his wishes in this matter, however much others might have wished otherwise.
And so the cremation will take place all Saturday in Delhi city by the side of the Jumna river. On Saturday fore noon, about 11-30, the pier will be taken out at Birla House and it will follow a prescribed route and go to the Jumna river. The cremation will take place there at about 4 P.M. The place and route will be announced by radio and the Press.
People in Delhi who wish to pay their last homage should gather along this route. I will not advise too many of them to come to Birla House, but rather to gather on both sides of this long route from Birla House to the Jumna river. And I trust that they will remain there in silence without any demonstrations. That is the best way and the most fitting way to pay homage to this great soul. Also, Saturday should be a day of fasting and prayer for all of us.
Those who live elsewhere, out of Delhi and in other parts of India, will no doubt also take such part as they can in this last homage. For them also, let this be a day of fasting and prayer. And at the appointed time for cremation, that is 4 P.M. on Saturday afternoon, people should go to the river or to the sea and offer prayers there. And while we pray, the greatest prayer that we can offer is to take a pledge to dedicate ourselves to the truth, and to the cause for which this great countryman of ours lived and for which he has died. That is the best prayer that we can offer him and his memory. That is the best prayer that we can offer to India and ourselves. JAI HIND.

(Broadcast to the Nation on the evening of January 30, 1948)

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WINSTON CHURCHILL BRACES BRITONS TO THEIR TASK
“I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat.”
When Winston Churchill addressed Parliament on May 13, 1940 he had just been appointed Prime Minister, a position that he held from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 until his retirement in 1955. His Conservative party sought to ready England for defense in the face of Nazi aggression, and Churchill rallied his country after succeeding Nevillc Chamberlain, a prime minister who thought he had achieved "peace for our time" in the appeasement of Hitler at Munich in 1938.
Churchill delivered speeches eminently suited for quoting, their memorable phrases ranging from "their finest hour" to "iron curtain." But no orator can guarantee that his prose will survive the editing of history: this 1940 speech about "blood, toil, tears and sweat" is now often identified by the altered quotation "blood, sweat, and tears." (The editing is apt; "toil" and "sweat" are redundant.) Curiously, common usage prefers to begin sequential phrases with "blood": Otto von Bismarck's warlikc 1862 Eisen und Blut was also switched around to "blood and iron."
The German threat, memorably described by Churchill as "a monstrous tyranny never surpassed in the dark and lamentable catalogue of human crime," is the foremost concern of the new prime minister. Addressing the House of Commons, he uses repetition and alliteration ("many, many months of struggle and suffering") to pound home the period of stress and sacrifice ahead. Through answers to his countrymen's questions ("You ask, what is our policy?" and "You ask, what is our aim?"), Churchill outlines his intentions for England during the onset of World War II.


BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS
On Friday evening last I received from His Majesty the mission to form a new administration.
It was the evident will of the Parliament and the nation that this should be conceived on the broadest possible basis and that it should include all parties.
I have already completed the most important pan of this task, A war cabinet has been formed of five members, representing, with the Labour, Opposition, and Liberals, the unity of the nation.
It was necessary that this should be done in one single day on account of the extreme urgency and rigor of events. Other key positions were filled yesterday. I am submitting a further list to the king tonight. I hope to complete the appointment of principal ministers during tomorrow.
The appointment of other ministers usually takes a little longer. I trust when Parliament meets again this part of my task will be completed and that the administration will be complete in all respects.
I considered it in the public interest to suggest to the Speaker that the House should be summoned today. At the end of today’s proceedings, the adjournment of the House will be proposed until May 21 with provision for earlier meeting if need be. Business for that will be notified to MPs at the earliest opportunity.
I now invite the House by a resolution to record its approval of the steps taken and declare its confidence in the new government. The resolution:
"That this House welcomes the formation of a government representing the united and inflexible resolve of the nation to prosecute the war with Germany to a victorious conclusion."
To form an administration of this scale and complexity is a serious undertaking in itself. But we are in the preliminary phase of one of the greatest battles in history. We are in action at many other points-in Norway and in Holland-and we have to be prepared in the Mediterranean. The air battle is continuing, and many preparations have to be made here at home.
In this crisis I think I may be pardoned if I do not address the House at any length today, and I hope that any of my friends and colleagues or former colleagues who are affected by the political reconstruction will make all allowances for any lack of ceremony with which it has been necessary to act.
I say to the House as I said to ministers who have joined this government. I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears, and sweat. We have before us an ordeal of the most grievous kind. We have before us many, many months of struggle and suffering.
You ask, what is our policy? I say it is to wage war by land, sea, and air. War with all our might and with all the strength God has given us, and to wage war against a monstrous tyranny never surpassed in the dark and lamentable catalogue of human crime. That is our policy.
You ask, what is our aim? I can answer in one word. It is victory. Victory at all costs-victory in spite of all terrors-victory, however long and hard the road may be, for without victory there is no survival.
Let that be realized. No survival for the British Empire, no survival for all that the British Empire has stood for, no survival for the urge, the impulse of the ages, that mankind shall move forward toward his goal.
I take up my task in buoyancy and hope. I feel sure that our cause will not be suffered to fail among men.
I feel entitled at this juncture, at this time, to claim the aid of all and to say, "Come then, let us go forward together with our united strength."
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


MARK ANTONY URGES MOURNERS TO VENGEANCE OVER THE BODY OF JULIUS CAESAR
"If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. . . . This was the most unkindest cut of all….”

If we can accept Thucydides' recollected account of the funeral oration of Pericles, we can stretch further from accuracy to accept William Shakespeare’s version, in his play Julius Caesar, of a speech by Mark Antony referred to by historians Plutarch and Dion Cassius.
The technique of the speaker is to seem to agree with what has been said before-in this case by Brutus, tool and front of the conspirators, who had told the crowd of Caesar, "As he was ambitious, I slew him." But the dramatist plants the- seeds of doubt by acting against the words, at first subtly imputing dishonor while appearing to concede honor in the previous speaker, and later savaging him with increasing sarcasm overlaying "honorable.' ,
The speaker poses (falsely, as the playwright shows the audience) as "a plain blunt man" without "the power of speech to stir men's blood," who can "only speak right on." Of course, the murdered man's friend speaks obliquely, pulling from his listeners the mutinous calls he professes not to make himself, closing with an egregious bribe. This mostly fictional speech about a factual conqueror is a playwright's lesson in how politicians can manipulate mobs.

ANTONY Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious:
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest,
For Brutus is an honorable man;
So are they all, all honorable men;
Cme I speak in Caesar’s funeral
He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
But Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honorable man.
He hath brought many captives home to Rome,
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:
Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept:
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honorable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?
Vet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And, sure. he is an honorable man.
I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause:
What cause withholds you then to mourn for him?
O judgment, thou are fled to brutish beasts
And men have lost their reason. Bear with me
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me.
FIRST CITIZEN. Methinks there is much reason in his sayings.
SECOND CITIZEN. If you consider rightly of the matter, Caesar has had done great wrong.
THIRD CITIZEN. Has he, masters?
I fear there will a worse come in his place.
FOURTH CITIZEN. Mark’d ye his words? He would not take the crown;
Therefore ‘tis certain he was not ambitious.
FIRST CITIZEN. If it be found so, some will dear abide it.
SECOND CITIZEN. Poor soul! His eyes are red as fire with weeping.
THIRD CITIZEN. There’s not a nobler man in Rome than Antony.
FOURTH CITIZEN. Now mark him, he begins again to speak.
ANTONY. But yesterday the world of Caesar might
Have stood against the world: now lies he there
And none so poor to do him reverence.
O masters, if I were disposed to stir
Your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage,
I should do Brutus wrong and Cassius wrong
Who, you all know, are honorable men.
I will not do them wrong; I rather choose
To wrong the dead, to wrong myself and you,
Than I will wrong such honorable men,
But here’s a parchment with the seal of Caesar;
I found it in his closet; ‘tis his will:
Let but the commons hear this testament-
Which pardon me, I do not mean to read-
And they would go and kiss dead Caesar’s wounds
And dip their napkins in his sacred blood,
Yea, beg a hair of him for memory,
And, dying, mention it within their wills,
Bequething it as a rich legacy
Unto their issue.
FOURTH CITIZEN. We’ll hear the will; read it, Mark Antony.
ALL. The will. the will! we will hear Caesar's will.
ANTONY. Have patience, gentle friends, I must not read it;
It is not meet you know how Caesar loved you.
You are not wood, you are not stones, but men;
And, being men, hearing the will of Caesar,
It will inflame you, it will make you mad:
'Tis good you know that that you are his heirs;
For if you should, 0, what would come of it.
FOURTH CITIZEN. Read the will; we'll hear it, Antony;
You shall read us the will, Caesar's will.
ANTONY. Will you be patient? will you stay awhile?
I have o'ershot myself to tell you of it:
I fear I wrong the honorable men
Whose daggers h ave stabb’d Caesar; I do fear it.
FOURTH CITIZEN. They were traitors: honorable men!
ALL. The will! The testament!
SECOND CITIZEN. They were villains, murderers: the will! Read the will.
ANTONY. You will compel me then to read the will?
Then make a ring about the corpse of Caesar,
And let me show you him that made the will.
Shall I descend? And will you give me leave?
ALL. Come down.
SECOND CITIZEN. Descend. (He comes down from the pulpit.)
THIRD CITIZEN. You shall have leave.
FOURTH CITIZEN. A ring; stand round.
FIRST CITIZEN. Stand from the hearse, stand from the body.
SECOND CITIZEN. Room for Antony, most noble Antony.
ANTONY. Nay, press not so upon me; stand far off.
ALL. Stand back. Room. Bear back.
ANTONY. If you have tears, prepare to shed them now.
You do not know this mantle: I remember
The first time ever Caesar put it on;
‘Twas on a summer’s evening, in his tent,
That day he overcame the Nervii:
Look, in this place ran Cassius’ dagger through:
See what a rent the envious Casca made:
Through this the well-belov’d Brutus stabb’d;
And as he pluck’d his cursed steel away,
Mark how the blood of Caesar follow’d it,
As rushing out of doors, to be resolved
If Brutus, as you know, was Caesar’s angel:
Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him.
This was the most unkindest cut of all;
For when the noble Caesar saw him stab,
Ingratitude, more strong than traitors’ arms,
Quite vanquish’d him: then burst his mighty heart;
And, in his mantle muffling up his face,
Even at the base of Pompey’s statue,
Which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell.
O, what a fall was there, my countrymen!
Then I, and you, and all of us fell down,
Whilst bloody treason flourish’d over us.
O, now you weep, and I perceive you feel
The dint of pity: these are gracious drops.
Kind souls, what weep you when you behold
Our Caesar’s vesture wounded? Look you here,
Here is himself, marr’d as you see, with traitors.
FIRST CITIZEN. O piteous spectacle!
SECOND CITIZEN. O noble Caesar!
THIRD CITIZEN. O woeful day!
FOURTH CITIZEN. O traitors, villains!
FIRST CITIZEN. O most bloody sight!
SECOND CITIZEN. We will be revenged.
ALL. Revenge! About! Seek! Burn! Fire!
Kill! Slay! Let not a traitor live!
ANTONY. Stay countrymen.
FIRST CITIZEN. Peace there! Hear the noble Antony.
SECOND CITIZEN. We’ll hear him, we’ll follow him, we’ll die with him.
ANTONY. Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up
To such a sudden flood of mutiny.
They that have done this deed are honorable;
What private griefs they have, alas, I know not.
That made them do it; they are wise and honorable,
And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you.
I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is;
But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man,
That love my friends; and that they know full well
That gave me public leave to speak of him:
For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth,
Acton, nor utterance, nor the power of speech,
To stir men’s blood: I only speak right on;
I tell you that which you yourselves do know;
Show you sweet Caesar’s wounds, poor poor dumb mouths,
And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus,
And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony
Would ruffle up your spirits, and put a tongue
In every wound of Caesar, that should move
The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.
ALL. We’ll mutiny.
FIRST CITIZEN. We’ll burn the house of Brutus.
THIRD CITIZEN. Away, then! Come, seek the conspirators.
ANTONY. Yet hear me, countrymen; yet hear me speak.
ALL. Peace, ho! Hear Antony. Most noble Antony!
ANTONY. Why, friends, you go to do you know not what:
Wherein hath Caesar thus deserved your loves?
Alas, you know not; I must tell you then:
You have forgot the will I told you of.
ALL. Most true: the will! Let’s stay and hear the will.
ANTONY. Here is the will, and under Caesar’s seal.
To every Roman Citizen he gives,
To every several man, seventy-five drachmas.
SECOND CITIZEN. Most noble Caesar! We’ll revenge his death.
THIRD CITIZEN. O royal Caesar!
ANTONY. Hear me with patience.
ALL. Peace, ho!
ANTONY. Moreover, he hath left you all his walks,
His private arbors and new-planted orchards,
On this side Tiber; he hath left them you,
And to your heirs for ever; common pleasures,
To walk abroad and recreate yourselves.
FIRST CITIZEN. Never, never. Come, away away!
We’ll burn his body in the holy place,
And with the brands fire the traitors’ houses.
Take up the body.
SECOND CITIZEN. Go fetch the fire.
THIRD CITIZEN. Pluck down benches.
FOURTH CTITIZEN. Pluck down forms, windows, anything.
(Exeunt Citizens with the body.)
ANTONY. Now let it work, Mischief, thou art afoot,
Take thou what course thou wilt.

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GEORGE BERNARD SHAW SALUTES HIS FRIEND ALBERT EINSTEIN
“ The heavenly bodies go in curves because that is the natural way for them to go, and so the whole Newtonian universe crumpled up and was succeeded by the Einstein universe.”
Dublin-born British dramatist George Bernard Shaw admired upsetters of applecarts, an activity he engaged in both as a socialist essayist and as author of Pgymalion and Mrs. Warren’s Profession. Shaw and Einstein met in 1921; Shaw looked on physicist Albert Einstein, twenty-six years his junior, as the man who annihilated the scientific establishment’s tidy Newtonian world.
"We ought to have declared war on Germany," Shaw said, "the moment Hitler’s police Einstein's violin." At the Savoy Hotel in London on October 28, 1930, Shaw spoke at a dinner honoring the scientist and raising funds for indigent European Jews. In a brief toast, he gave other laymen an inkling of the meaning of Einstein's work.

Napoleon and other great men were makers of empires, but these eight men whom I am about to mention were makers of universes, and their hands were not stained with the blood of their fellow men. I go back twenty-five hundred years, and how many can I count in that period? I can count them on the fingers of my two hands.
Pythagoras, Ptolemy, Kepler, Copernicus, Aristotle, Galileo, Newton, and Einstein-and I still have two fingers left vacant.
Even among those eight men I must make a distinction. I have called them makers of the universe, but some of them were only repairers. Newton made a universe which lasted for three hundred years. Einstein has made a universe, which I suppose you want me to say will never stop, but I don't know how long it will last.
These great men, they have been the makers of one side of humanity, which has two sides. We call the one side religion, and we call the other science, Religion is always right. Religion protects us against that great problem which we all must face. Science is always wrong; it is the very artifice of men. Science will never solve one problem without raising ten more problems.
What have all of those great men been doing? Each in turn claimed the other was wrong, and now you are expecting me to say that Einstein proved that Newton was wrong. But you forget that when science reached Newton, science came up against that extraordinary Englishman. That had never happened before.
Newton lent a power so extraordinary that if I was speaking fifteen years ago, as I am old enough to have done, I would have said that he had the greatest mind that ever man was endowed with. Combine the light of that wonderful mind with credulity, with superstition. He knew his people; he knew his language; he knew his own folk; he knew a lot of things; he knew that an honest bargain was a square deal and an honest man was one who gave a square deal.
He knew his universe; he knew that it consisted of heavenly bodies that were in motion, and he also knew the one thing you cannot do to anything whatsoever is to make it move in a straight line. In other words, motion will not go in a straight line.
Mere fact will never stop an Englishman. Newton invented a straight line, and that was the law of gravitation, and when he had invented this, he had created a universe which was wonderful in itself. When applying his wonderful genius, when he had completed a book of that universe, what sort of book was it? It was a book which told you the station of all the heavenly bodies, It showed the rate at which they were traveling; it showed the exact hour at which they would arrive at such and such a point to make an eclipse. It was not a magical, marvelous thing; it was a matter-of-fact thing.
For three hundred years we believed in that Newtonian universe as I suppose no system has been believed in before. I know I was educated in it and was brought up to believe in firmly. Then a young professor came along.
He said a lot of things, and we called him a blasphemer. He claimed Newton's theory of the apple was wrong:
He said, “Newton did not know what happened to the apple, and I can prove this when the next eclipse comes.”
We said, “The next thing you will be doing is questioning the law of gravitation.”
The young professor said, “No, I mean no harm to the law of gravitation, but for my part. I can go without it.”
“What do you mean, go without it?”
He said, “ I can tell you about that afterward.”
The world is not a rectilinear world: It is a curvilinear world. The heavenly bodies go in curves because that is the natural way for them to go, and so the whole Newtonian universe crumpled up and was succeeded by the Einstein universe. Here is England, he is a wonderful man.
This man is not challenging the fact of science; he is challenging the action of science. Not only is he challenging the action of science, but the action of science has surrendered to his challenge.
Now, ladies and gentlemen, are you ready for the toast? I drink to the greatest of our contemporaries, Einstein.

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LINCOLN, IN HIS SECOND INAUGURAL, SEEKS TO HEAL THE SPIRITUAL WOUNDS OF WAR
“With malice towards none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive to finish the work we are in… to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.”
On March 4, 1865, the Civil War was thirty-seven days from its end. Lincoln, having incorporated the abstract cause of preserving the Union and majority rule into the more rallying cause of human freedom, used his second inaugural to preach a sermon looking past the war’s bitterness to a time of what he felt had to be reconciliation and reconstruction.
He raises a Joban question in this most religiously philosophical of inaugural addresses: Why did God put this nation through such terrible punishment? Could God have a different purpose from that supposed to be right by man? Lincoln's suggested answer: God's purpose is part of some unknown and unknowable design; “the Almighty has his own purposes,” He cites the Gospel according to Saint Matthew (18:7), quoting Jesus' warning of fearsome retribution to those who harm his believing children: “Woe unto the world because of offenses! for it must needs be that offenses come; but woe to that man by whom the offense cometh!” Lincoln reasons that the offense or temptation to sin, to the innocent children was slavery, and that the people of both North and South were those by whom that offense of slavery came; therefore, Lincoln asks rhetorically, are we to question God's justice? No; even if that justice means that “every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword,” we must accept the justice hailed in the Psalm of David (19:9): “the judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether.”
Lincoln (unlike Job) bids his countrymen accept the punishment as evidence that the great offense was committed and for expiation thereof, which gives them “firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right”- which is only a limited and imperfect vision, but which includes God’s justice in “a just and lasting peace.” Lincoln’s final, unifying touch is to say this peace comes not between the warring regions but among ourselves, as American individuals, and, looking beyond the civil war, “with all nations.”
Lincoln wrote later of his second inaugural, and its theme of the inscrutability of God’s serene injustice, “I expect it to wear as well as, perhaps better than, anything I have produced; but I believe it is not immediately popular. Men are not flattered by being shown that there has been a difference of purpose between the Almighty and them. To deny it, however, in this case, is to deny that there is a God governing the world.”

Fellow countrymen:
At this second appearing to take the oath of the presidential office there is less occasion for an extended address than there was at the first. Then a statement, somewhat in detail, of a course to be pursued seemed fitting and proper. Now, at the expiration of four years, during which public declarations have been constantly called forth on every point and phase of the great contest which still absorbs the attention and engrosses the energies of the nation, little that is new could be presented. The progress of our arms, upon which all else chiefly depends, is as well known to the public as to myself, and it is, I trust, reasonably satisfactory and encouraging to all. With high hope for the future, no prediction in regard to it is ventured.
On the occasion corresponding to this four years ago all thoughts were anxiously directed to an impending civil war. All dreaded it; all sought to avert it. While the inaugural address was being delivered from this place, devoted altogether to saving the Union without war, insurgent agents were in the city seeking to destroy it without war - seeking to dissolve the Union and divide effects by negotiation, Both parties deprecated war, but one of them would make war rather than let the nation survive, and the other would accept war rather than let it perish, and the war came.
One-eighth of the whole population were colored slaves, not distributed generally over the Union, but localized in the southern part of it. These slaves constituted a peculiar and powerful interest. All knew that this interest was somehow the cause of war. To strengthen, perpetuate, and extend this interest was the object for which the insurgents would rend the Union even by war, while the government claimed no right to do more than to restrict the territorial enlargement of it. Neither party expected for the war the magnitude or the duration which it has already attained. Neither anticipated that the cause of the conflict might cease with or even before the conflict itself should cease. Each looked for an easier triumph, and a result less fundamental and astounding. Both read the same Bible and pray to the same God, and each invokes his aid against the other. It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God's assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men's faces, but let us judge not. that we be not judged. The prayers of both could not be answered. That of neither has been answered fully. The Almighty has his own purposes. "Woe unto the world because of offenses; For it must needs be that offenses come, but woe to that man by whom the offense cometh." If we shall suppose that American slavery is one of those offenses which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which, having continued through his appointed time, he now wills to remove, and that he gives to both North and South this terrible war as the woe due to those by whom the offense came, shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a living God always ascribe to him? Fondly do we hope, fervently do we pray, that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue until all the wealth piled by the bondsman’s two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said “the judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether.”
With malice towards none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and. lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.

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CHEMIST LOUIS PASTEUR PRAISES THE RISE OF SCIENTIFIC EDUCATION
“Worship the spirit of criticism.”
Louis Pasteur, French chemist of the nineteenth century who founded the science of microbiology, made the most important discovery in medical history: contagious diseases are transmitted by germs. A champion of rigorous scientific inquiry, he was honored in 1888 with the opening in Paris of the Pasteur Institute.
As the first director of this institute named for him, Pasteur was asked to address his colleagues on November 14, 1888. He was, it is reported “overcome by his feelings,” and his son delivered for him the prepared speech in praise of education, a talk that specifically expressed Pasteur’s pride in his country’s respect for educational progress (“From village schools to laboratories, everything has been founded or renovated”).
Pasteur’s speech celebrates the accomplishments of his countrymen while mourning the passage of time, with a series of subordinate “if” clauses to express regrets. The speech begins and ends in patriotic sentiment, marked by a study in contrast of “two contrary laws” (“The one seeks violent conquests; the other, the relief of humanity”). It also contains straightforward advice, always effective in a speech, especially by an acknowledged expert.
The portion of the speech that follows is from Rene Valery-Radot’s The Life of Pasteur, translated from the French by Mrs. R. L. Devonshire.

When the day came that, foreseeing the future which would be opened by the discovery of the attenuation of virus, I appealed to my country, so that we should be allowed, through the strength and impulse of private initiative, to build laboratories to be devoted, not only to the prophylactic treatment of hydrophobia, but also to the study of virulent and contagious diseases- on that day again, France gave in handfuls…. It is now finished, this great building, of which it might be said that there is not a stone but what is the material sign of a generous thought. All the virtues have subscribed to build this dwelling place for work.
Alas! Mine is the bitter grief that I enter it, a man “vanquished by time” deprived of my masters, even of my companions in the struggle, Dumas, Bouley, Paul Bert, and lastly Vulpian, who, after having been with you, my dear Grancher, my counselor at the very first, became the most energetic, the most convinced champions of this method.
However, if I have the sorrow of thinking that they are no more, after having valiantly taken their part in discussions which I have never provoked but have had to endure; if they cannot hear me proclaim all that I owe to their counsels and support; if I have at least the consolation of believing that all that we struggled for together will not perish. The collaborators and pupils are now here to share the scientific faith…. Keep your early enthusiasm, dear collaborators, but let it ever be regulated by rigorous examinations and tests. Never advance anything which cannot be proved in a simple and decisive fashion.
Worship is the spirit of criticism. If reduced to itself, it is not an awakener of ideas or a stimulant to great things, but, without it, everything is fallible; it always has the last word. What I am now asking you, and you will ask of your pupils later on, is what is most difficult to an inventor.
It is indeed a hard task, when you believe you have found an important scientific fact and are feverishly anxious to publish it, to constrain yourself for days, weeks, years sometimes, to fight with yourself, to try and ruin your own experiments and only to proclaim your discovery after having exhausted all contrary hypotheses.
But when, after so many efforts, you have at last arrived at a certainty, your joy is one of the greatest which can be felt by a human soul, and the thought that you will have contributed to the honor of your country renders that joy still deeper.
If science has no country. the scientist should have one. and ascribe to it the influence which his works may have in this world. . . , Two contrary laws seem to be wrestling with each other nowadays; the one, a law of blood and of death, ever imagining new means of destruction and forcing nations to be constantly ready for the battlefield- the other, a law of peace, work and health, ever evolving new means of delivering man from the scourges which beset him.
The one seeks violent conquests; the other, the relief of humanity. The latter places one human life above any victory; while the former would sacrifice hundreds and thousands of lives to the ambition of one. The law of which we are the instruments seeks, even in the midst of carnage, to cure the sanguinary ills of the law of war; the treatment inspired by our antiseptic methods may preserve thousands of soldiers. Which of those two laws will ultimately prevail God alone knows. But we may assert that French science will have tried, by obeying the law of humanity, to extend the frontiers of life.

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LANGUAGE MAVEN WILLIAM SAFIRE DENOUNCES THE TELEPHONE AS THE SUBVERTER OF GOOD ENGLISH

“It is harder to put your foot in your mouth when you when you have pen in your hand.”

Look, this doesn’t compare with Pericles and Patrick Henry, but every anthologist is entitled to the inclusion of one of his own. It was delivered at my alma mater, Syracuse University, on May 13, 1978, and the graduates lapped it up.

Classmates:
I entered Syracuse University with the class of ‘51, dropped out after two years, and am finally receiving my degree with the class, of ‘78. There is hope for slow learners.
My subject today is “The Decline of the Written Word.” If the speech I have written is disjointed and confusing, you will get my point the hard way.
We have not heard a really eloquent speech out of the White House in a long time. Why? When you ask the speechwriters of Mr. Ford and Mr. Carter, they give you this explanation: they say that “high-flown rhetoric” is not their man’s style.
But that is not responsive. A flowery speech is a bad speech. Simple, straight English prose can be used to build a great speech. There has to be a more profound reason for the reluctance of the presidents of the seventies to, write out their thoughts plainly and deliver them in words we can all understand.
If you press the president’s aides-and that’s my job, to press them hard-they’ll admit that their man much prefers to “ad-lib” answers to questions. He’s not good at what they call a “set” speech.
What do they really mean by that? They mean a speech-a written speech, developing an idea- is not what people want to hear. People prefer short takes, Q. and A.; the attention span of most Americans on serious matters is about twenty seconds, the length of a television clip.
In the same way, people do not want to read articles as they once did; today, if you cannot get your message in a paragraph, forget it.
As a result, we’re becoming a short-take society. Our presidency, which Theodore Roosevelt called a “bully pulpit” has become a forum for twenty-second spots. Our food for thought is junk food.
What has this brought about? I don’t blame President Carter for this- he reflects the trend; he did not start it. I don’t flail out at the usual whipping boy, television.
The reason for the decline of the written word- speeches, written articles- is that we, as a people, are writing less and talking more. Because it takes longer to prepare our thoughts on paper, that means we are adlibbing more, and it also means we are thinking more superficially. An ad lib has its place, but not ad nauseam.
That’s one of those sweeping statements that pundits are permitted to make. But let me turn reporter for a minute and prove to you that we’re talking more and writing less.
Most people are not writing personal letters any more. Oh, the volume of first-class mail has doubled since 1950, but here’s the way the mail breaks down. Over 80 percent is business related; over 10 percent is greeting card and Christmas card; and only 3 percent is from one person to another to chew the fat.
More and more, we’re relying on commercial poets and cartoonists to express our thoughts for us. Tomorrow is Mother’s Day; how many of us are relying on canned sentiments? I remember my brother once laboriously handmade a card for my mother: on the front was “I’ll never forget you, Mother,” and inside it said, “You gave away my dog.” Okay he was sore, but at least he was original.
The greatest cultural villain of our times has a motherly image: Ma Bell. The telephone company. Instead of writing, people are calling; instead of communicating, they’re “staying in touch.”
There you are, all about to be holders of college degrees. When was the last time you wrote, or received, a long, thoughtful letter? When was the last time you wrote a passionate love letter? No, that takes time, effort, thought- there’s a much easier way, the telephone. The worst insult is when kids call home, collect, for money; when my kids go to college, the only way they’ll get a nickel out of me is to write for it.
As the percentage of personal mail has dwindled, the number of telephone installations since 1950 has quadrupled. The average person’s need to write has been undermined by the simple economics: as the cost of a letter has gone up, the cost of a call has gone down.
During World War I, a first-class letter cost two cents an ounce; in a few weeks, it will be fifteen cents an ounce. In that same sixty years, a New York-to-San Francisco call has gone from twenty dollars for three minutes down to fifty-three cents today, if you’re willing to call at night or on a weekend. The penny postcard is a dime. Letters up almost 800 percent; phone calls down to one-fortieth of the cost to grandpa. No wonder the market share of communication has dropped for letter writers. In the year I was a freshman here, the Postal Service had over a third of the communication business; today, it is one-sixth, and falling.
And it’s going to get worse: phonevision is on the way. We have seen what happened to the interpersonal correspondence of love in the past generation. The purple passage of prose, and tear-stained pages of the love letter- that’s gone now. It has become the heavy breathing, grunts, and “like, I mean, y’know, wow” of the love call. The next stage, with the visual dimension, will not even require a loud sigh: we can just wave at each other to say hello; wiggle our fingers to express affection: raise our eyebrows to ask, “What’s new?,” get a shrug in reply, and sign off with a smile and a wink.
We need not degenerate further from written English to verbal grunts, and then to sign language. We need to become modern reactionaries; I consider myself a neo-Neanderthal, and my happiest moment of the year comes as daylight savings ends in October, when I can turn back the clock.
How do we save ourselves from the tyranny of the telephone? How do we liberate our language from the addiction to the ad lib?
If this were an off-the cuff presentation, I would drift off into a fuzzy evasion like “There are no easy answers.” But one thing I have learned in preparing my first commencement address, and the main advice I shall burden you with today is this: there are plenty of easy answers. The big trick is to think about them and write them down.
There are four steps to the salvation of the English language, and thus to the rejuvenation of clear thinking in your working lives.
First, remember that first drafts are usually stupid. If you shoot off your mouth with your first draft- that is, if you say what you think before you’ve had a chance to think- your stupidity shines forth for all to hear. But, if you write your first draft- of a letter, a memo, a description of some transcendental experience that comes to you while jogging- then you fall on your face in absolute privacy. You get the chance to change it all around. It is harder to put your foot in your mouth when you have your pen in your hand.
Second, reject the notion that honesty and candor demand that you “let it all hang out.” That’s not honesty; that’s intellectual laziness. Tuck some of it in; edit some of it out. Talking on your feet, spinning thoughts off the top of your head, and just rapping along in a laid-back way have been glorified as “expressing your natural self.” But you did not get in touch with your feelings.” Fine- talk to yourself; we all do that. But, if you want to communicate with another thinking human being, get in touch with your thoughts. Put them in order; give them a purpose; use them to persuade, to instruct, to discover, to seduce. The secret way to do this is to write it down and then cut out the confusing parts.
Third, never forget that you own the telephone; the telephone does not own you. Most people cannot bear to listen to a phone ring without answering it. It’s easy to not answer a letter, but it’s hard to not answer a phone. Let me pass along a solution that has changed my life. When I was in the Nixon administration, my telephone was tapped- I had been associating with known journalists. So I took an interest in the instrument itself. Turn it upside down; you will notice a lever that says “louder.” Turn it away from the direction of louder. That is the direction of emancipation. If somebody needs to see you, he’ll come over. If others need to tell you what they think, or even express how they feel, they can write. There are those who will call a recluse- but it is better to listen to your own different drummer than to go through life a ringing in your ears.
My fourth point will impress upon you the significance of the written word. Those of you who have been secretly taking notes, out of a four-year old habit, will recall that I spoke of “four steps” to the salvation of the English language. Here it is: there is no fourth step. I had the fourth step in mind when I began, but I forgot it.
Now, If I were ad-libbing, I would remember I had promised four points, and I would do what so many stump speakers do- toss in the all-purpose last point, which usually begins, “There are no easy answers.” But, in writing down what you think, you can go back and fix it- instead of having to phumph around with a phony fourth point, you can change your introduction to “there are three steps.” Perhaps you wonder why I did not do so. Not out of any excess of honesty, or unwillingness to make a simple fix- I just wanted you to see the fourth step take shape before your very eyes.
Is the decline of the written word inevitable? Will the historians of the future deal merely in oral history? I hope not. I hope that oral history will limit itself to the discovery of toothpaste and the invention of mouthwash. I don’t want to witness the decomposing of the art of composition, or be present when we get in touch with our feelings and lose contact with our minds.
I’m a conservative in politics, which means I believe that we as a people have to lead our leaders, to show them how we want to be led.
Accordingly, I think we have to send a message to the podium from the audience: we’re ready for more than Q. and A. We’re ready for five or ten minutes of sustained explication. A “fireside chat” will not turn out our fires. On the contrary- if a speaker will take the time to prepare, we are prepared to pay in the coin of our attention.
That, of course, is contrary to the trend, against the grain. It can come only form people who care enough to compose, who get in the habit of reading rather than listening, of being in communication instead of only in contact.
When Great Britain was fighting World War II alone, an American president did something that would be considered cornball today: FDR sent Churchill a poem, alongwith a letter, that read:

Sail on, O Ship of State!
Sail on, O Union, strong and great!
Humanity will al its fears,
With all the hopes of future years,
Is hanging breathless on thy fate!

Churchill took the message- delivered to him by Wendell Willkie, who had just been defeated by FDR- and selected a poem in answer. At that moment, looking east, England faced invasion; looking to the west across the Atlantic, Churchill saw potential help. The poem he sent concluded with the words:
And not by eastern windows only,
When daylight comes, cones in the light;
In front, the sun climbs slow, how slowly,
But westward, look, the land is bright.

High-flown rhetoric? Perhaps. And perhaps poetry, which had an honorable place in a 1961 inauguration, is too rich for some tastes today.
And now I remember the fourth step. I like to think we can demand some sense of an occasion, some uplift, some inspiration from our leaders. Not empty words and phony promises- but words full of meaning, binding thoughts together with purpose, holding promise of understandable progress. If we ask for it, we’ll get it- if we fail to ask, we’ll get more Q. and A.
I believe we can arrest the decline of the written word, thereby achieving a renaissance of clarity. And not by eastern establishment windows only. The hope is on this side of the Potomac, the Charles, and the Hudson rivers- westward, look, the land is bright.






Monday, 19-Nov-2007 18:22 Email | Share | | Bookmark
MODEL LOM CONSTITUTION FOR CHAPTERS



MODEL LOM CONSTITUTION FOR CHAPTERS


PREAMBLE
We, young men and women of______________________________ (Name of Town / City) gathered at this meeting conscious of the fact that adequate civic training of young persons will enable them to exercise decisive influence in the just solution of the problems of humanity; Determine to promote the well-being and progress of all people; RESOLVE, to unite our efforts in these directions by constituting an association of young citizens of the city based upon the principles enshrined within this Constitution.
I. THE CONSTITUTION:
The Constitution of this association shall be comprised of the Memorandum of Association and the Rules and Regulations as provided hereunder.
II. MEMORANDUM OF ASSOCIATION:
a. The name of this society shall be Junior Chamber International _________________(Name of the society). In its abbreviated form it will be named as JCI _________________.
b. The registered office of this society shall be situated at__________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________
(Address of the Registered Office)
c. Aims and Objectives: The main object for which this society is formed shall be based on a declaration of principles as inspired by the Jaycee Creed, which is as follows:
Declaration of Principles: The principles of Jaycees are based upon a belief in:
• Faith in God.
• The brotherhood of man.
• Individual freedom and dignity.
• Government of laws.
• The value of human personality.
• Service to humanity.
Jaycee Creed:
We believe
That faith in God gives meaning and purpose to human life;
That the brotherhood of man transcends the sovereignty of nations;
That economic justice can best be won by free men through free enterprise;
That government should be of laws rather than of men;
That earth's great treasure lies in human personality;
And That service to humanity is the best work of life.
d. Purposes:
1. To encourage the extension of Jaycees association and its ideals throughout India in such manner as may be thought fit.
2. To complement the activities of JCI India as well as its other chapters and to take common action in the interest of this society.
3. To foster amongst individual membership of this society a spirit of genuine civic interest, offering the opportunities for personal development and avenues for involved participation in the social and economic advancement of the community and the Nation.
4. To encourage and strengthen international understanding and goodwill especially through active participation of the members of this society in world-wide projects and in the activities of the Jaycees movement.
5. To encourage and advance mutual understanding and goodwill amongst young men and women in the Republic of India regardless of caste, creed or color.
6. To promote feelings of secularism in the Republic of India.
7. To help in the social emancipation of all individuals.
8. To encourage and provide facilities to all young people in leadership training.
9. To encourage and provide facilities for the promotion of goodwill and confidence amongst mankind through fellowship.
10. To encourage young people to handle civic problems by arousing civic consciousness amongst the citizens.
11. To encourage and provide facilities for discussion of social, economic and cultural questions of local or national importance.
12. To encourage and provide facilities to help activities in sports.
13. To organize programs, seminars, conferences etc., in furtherance of all or anyone of the objects.
14. To donate or otherwise assist in any manner, any public charitable institution or public charitable objects, in-so-far-as such donations or assistance do not contravene any of the objects enumerated in this memorandum.
15. To spread education of all kinds, i.e. physical, technical and moral in any manner.
16. To grant medical aid to persons, without any distinction of caste and creed.
17. To grant relief in any form to destitute and orphaned persons and to the needy and poor persons who are physically challenged.
18. To establish and / or to maintain and / or to support sanitariums, convalescent homes, hospitals, dispensaries, maternity homes, clinics etc. and / or to contribute for the support of such institutions.
19. To establish and / or to maintain and / or to contribute towards the cost of buildings for any cultural activities of a public charitable nature.
20. To co-ordinate its activities with other associations, cultural or charitable institution which has as its objectives, any one or all of the above objects.
21. To establish and / or to maintain and / or to contribute towards cost of buildings for any purposes connected with the promotion of educational activities of the people.
22. To contribute or to subscribe or to donate to the Government or local institution such sum or sums on such terms and conditions for all or any of the objects herein.
23. To subscribe and / or to contribute and / or to donate to any public fund devoted to any public, national or charitable objects.
24. To give donation, contribution and subscription to any public, religious or charitable institutions having for their objects the alleviation of human suffering by spread of moral or spiritual education and / or for maintenance or protection or the relief of old, infirm, blind, lame, lepers or mentally ill, disabled or handicapped or otherwise diseased persons or poor persons or having any other objectives of public or charitable nature.
25. To spread education of any kind including technical, medical, arts, commerce, science, engineering, social, physical education by establishing and / or by promoting and / or by maintaining libraries, schools, colleges, research institutions for imparting of all and every kind of education and / or by giving grants, scholarships, and endowments to libraries, institutions, colleges and schools imparting such education and by contribution to or establishing and maintaining hostels.
26. To give donation to institutions which are doing the work of social, moral and spiritual uplift of the humanity and by helping or subsidizing books, periodicals, magazines and pamphlets and holding seminars, conferences which may contribute to the advancement of any object of the society.
27. To construct and / or maintain buildings for carrying out any cultural activities, which may have the effect of encouraging social welfare and emancipation.
28. To promote professional and commercial activities and develop national and international trade.
29. To promote high ethical standard in trade, business, profession, vocation, occupation etc.
30. To accept any donation and / or contribution either in cash or any kind, from any person, firm, company, institution or Government on such terms and conditions for such purpose and objects as are enumerated in this Memorandum.
31. To pay, out of the funds of the Society the cost, charges and expenses, preliminary and incidental to the formation, establishment and registration of the Society.
32. The income and property of the society, where ever derived shall be applied solely towards the promotion of the objects of the society as set forth in this Memorandum of Association and no portion thereof shall be paid or transferred directly or indirectly by way of dividends, bonus or otherwise, howsoever by way of profits to the members of the society, provided that nothing herein shall prevent the payment of salary or remuneration or reimbursement of expenses in good faith to any officers or servants of the Society or other persons in return for any services actually rendered to the Society.
33. To rent, purchase, lease, build or otherwise acquire for the use of the Society, suitable building or buildings, in the city/district in the Republic of India and to fit and furnish the same or make arrangements for the building or buildings being properly fitted and furnished.
34. To manage, conduct and carry on in the buildings purchased, leased built or otherwise acquired the business of the Society for the comfort and convenience of the members of the Society and visitors thereto.
35. To borrow any money required for the purpose of the Society upon such securities as may be determined.
36. To take any action necessary or conducive to the accomplishment of any of the above purposes. The objects set forth in any sub-clause of this clause shall not be in any way limited or restricted by reference to or interference from the terms of any other sub-clause or the objects therein specified or the powers thereby conferred shall be deemed subsidiary or auxiliary merely to the objects mentioned in the first sub-clause, of this clause but the Society shall have full powers to exercise all or any of the powers conferred by any part of this clause subject to the provisions of the Constitution and Policy Manual and directives of the General Body of JCI India. We, the several persons, whose names are subscribed below, are desirous of being formed into a Society under the Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860 in pursuance of this, Memorandum of Association and the certified copy of the Rules and Regulations of the Society.
Name & Address Occupation Signature
(All the persons to sign with complete details)
III. RULES AND REGULATIONS:
ARTICLE - 1
REGISTRATION
1.1 Registration -
a) This society shall be registered under the Indian Societies Registration Act, 1860.
b) The affairs of this Society shall be governed by the provisions as set out in its Memorandum of Association and in its Articles of Association, subject to the provisions of the Indian Societies Registration Act, 1860 and the rules framed there under.
1.2 Affiliation - This society must be affiliated to JCI India and it shall be governed by the Constitution of JCI India in force from time to time in so far as it affects and prescribes the functions of the chapter or the Local Organization Member (LOM) and in all other respects with the Constitution of this society.
1.3 Emblem - This society shall have an official emblem in royal blue color as illustrated below:
1.4 Oath -
(a) Individual Member:
The official oath to be administered to an individual member of the chapter shall be as follows: "I do solemnly promise that I shall faithfully serve the purposes of the Junior Chamber and shall at all times uphold its ideals and principles".
(b) Office Bearer:
All officers and officers-elect of the chapter shall be administered the oath as follows:
"I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of (name of office) of (name of the Chapter) and will to the best of my ability serve as a living example of this organization’s philosophy and belief and will uphold and enforce the Constitution and Policy of this organization at all times".
ARTICLE - 2
MEMBERSHIP
2.1 Types - There shall be three types of membership in this society:
(a) Active Members. (b) Associate Members. (c) Honorary Members.
a) Active members: A person of good character and sound mind, who has paid his/her dues fully to the chapter and who is within the age limit of not less than eighteen (18) years and not more than forty (40) years can be a member of this society. Provided further, that membership shall continue until the end of the calendar year in which the person reaches (i.e. completes) the age of forty years except the person holding the office of Immediate Past President, who may serve in that capacity for not more than one year.
b) Associate Members: An active member, who has attained his/her 40th birthday and continues to take interest in the activities of the Chapter, subject to his/her payment of dues to the chapter as resolved by the General Body of the chapter from time to time.
c) Honorary Members: An individual, who has rendered outstanding services to this Society or who has rendered outstanding contribution in any field of human endeavor, may be conferred with Honorary Membership of the chapter by the Chapter Governing Board.
2.2 Fees - All applications for membership shall be on the prescribed application form of the chapter along with the entrance fees as resolved by the General Body of the chapter from time to time. Two active members of the chapter, as a Proposer and as a Seconder, shall forward every application form. The decision of the Chapter Governing Board regarding the admission of a member to the chapter shall be final and no reason needs to be given to the applicant for the rejection of any application of membership. Moreover, the chapter shall not place any undue restriction for any applicant other than those laid down in the Constitution of JCI India.
2.3 Dues - A member shall pay the dues as fixed by the General body of the Chapter from time to time. The annual dues shall be paid in one full installment or in two equal installments. The said dues must include the dues payable by an individual member to JCI India. An act of a chapter failing to pay the dues of an individual member payable to JCI India shall be construed as an act of misconduct of the chapter. Any member or his/her heirs shall not be absolved from liability to pay any amount payable to the chapter by him/her even after the termination of the said member.
2.4 Suspension -
a) A member shall be served with a show cause notice as to why his membership may not be suspended, if in the opinion of the Chapter Governing Board, he is not qualified or desirable for membership or is unfit for any reason to continue as a member of the Chapter.
b) The Secretary upon the direction of the Chapter Governing Board shall issue the show cause notice to the member giving 21 days time to the member from the date of the notice (either delivered personally or sent by registered post).
c) The Chapter Governing Board after considering the explanation of the member may suspend the said member by a ¾ majority vote.
2.5 Termination -
1. a) A member shall be served with a show cause notice as to why his membership may not be suspended, if in the opinion of the Chapter Governing Board, he is not qualified or desirable for membership or is unfit for any reason to continue as a member of the Chapter.
b) The Secretary upon the direction of the Chapter Governing Board shall issue the show cause notice to the member giving 21 days time to the member from the date of the notice (either delivered personally or sent by registered post).
c) The Chapter Governing Board after considering the explanation of the member may terminate the said member by a ¾ majority vote.
2. A member shall be terminated if he resigns from his/her membership of the chapter provided the Chapter Governing Board accepts the said resignation of the member.
3. A member shall automatically stand terminated if he/she dies.
4. A member shall be terminated if the member transfers his/her membership of the chapter to any other chapter in India. The member shall do so only after paying the full dues to the chapter to which he/she originally belonged to and on obtaining a clearance certificate from the said chapter.
2.6 Transfer - A member of a chapter shall transfer their membership to any other chapter in India after paying the full dues to the chapter to which he/she originally belonged to and on obtaining a clearance certificate from the said chapter. Having paid such dues and other arrears by the member to the chapter, the chapter shall necessarily issue the clearance certificate to the member. In case, the chapter fails to issue the clearance certificate to the member within 15 days of the receipt of the member's demand by a registered letter to the chapter, it shall be deemed that there is no objection from the chapter. The chapter to which the member has sought for transfer has to accept to take him/her as a member. This chapter shall pay Rs. 50/- as the transfer fee to JCI India for a member who has been transferred.
ARTICLE - 3
GENERAL BODY
3.1 Composition - The General Body of the chapter shall consist of all the members of the chapter. The General Body of the chapter shall be the supreme body of the chapter. It shall direct and guide the affairs of the Chapter and shall have all the rights and privileges not specifically assigned to the Chapter Governing Board of the chapter. The General Body of the chapter shall have the power to revise, alter or amend any decision of the Chapter Governing Board.
3.2 Meetings -
a) The General Body of the chapter shall meet periodically at least once in every month for the purposes of transacting general business or for carrying out any projects. The General Body of the chapter shall meet to consider a specific subject as decided by the ¾ majority decision of the Chapter Governing Board or at the written request of at least 20% of the active members of the chapter, within 2 weeks of the aforesaid decision or the receipt of the aforesaid request. In this extra-ordinary General Body meeting of the chapter, no other business other than the stated specific subject shall be transacted.
b) The General Body of the chapter shall meet within 30 days of the chapter Installation meeting to finalize the Annual Program Planning of the chapter and the same shall be circulated to all the members of the chapter within 10 days of the aforesaid General Body meeting.
c) The Annual General Body meeting of the chapter shall be held every year subject to the condition that the period between two consecutive Annual General Body meetings shall not exceed 15 months. The following business shall be transacted at the Annual General Body meeting of the chapter:
1) To approve the minutes of the previous Annual General Body meeting and any Extra-Ordinary General Body meeting of the chapter held during the year.
2) To approve the Agenda of the meeting.
3) To receive the Annual Report presented by the President of the chapter.
4) To approve the audited accounts of the year.
5) To approve the budget for the next year.
6) To appoint auditor/s and fix their remuneration for the next year.
7) To consider any amendment/s to the Constitution of the chapter.
To consider any motion if it is given, in writing to the Secretary of the chapter, by any member 15 days in advance of the date of the said meeting provided, the copies of such motion is circulated to all the members of the chapter by the Secretary within 7 clear days prior to the convening of the said meeting.
d) An annual election meeting of the chapter shall be conducted at least 30 days prior to the National Convention of JCI India. At the annual election meeting of the chapter, the active members of the General Body of the chapter shall elect the officers constituting a Chapter Governing Board.
e) The Secretary of the chapter shall issue the notice of the Annual General Body meeting/Annual Election meeting of the chapter, to all the members, 21 clear days prior to the convening of the said meeting. The Secretary of the chapter shall issue the notice of the General Body meeting to all the members 5 clear days prior to the convening of the said meeting. Any notice shall be sent by ordinary post to all the members of the chapter at their addresses as found in the records of the chapter. Accidental non-receipt of a notice by any member shall not invalidate any meeting. The notice for an Annual General Body meeting or an Extra-ordinary General Body meeting or an Election meeting shall be sent by certificate of posting to all the members of the chapter.
f) A quorum for all the General Body meetings, apart from a non-business nature meeting, is the presence of 30% of the active members of the chapter. If no quorum is present within 30 minutes of the scheduled time of the Annual General Body meeting, then the meeting will stand adjourned. The Chairman of the meeting then shall fix the date, time and place for the adjourned meeting, which is to be held within seven days of the adjourned meeting after due notice. Then the members of the chapter present shall proceed with the meeting, even if they do not constitute a quorum. If no quorum is present within 30 minutes of the scheduled time for an Extra-Ordinary General Body meeting, then this meeting shall stand dissolved forthwith.
g) Any meeting may be adjourned by the Chairman of the said meeting with the consent of the 3/4th of the members present to fix the time and venue of the said meeting for any unfinished business, provided the said meeting is held within seven days after due notice.
h) Every active member of the chapter, who has no financial obligations to the chapter, shall have the right to vote. Associate and Honorary members of the chapter shall have no voting right.
i) The President shall chair all the meetings of the chapter. In the absence of the President at a meeting, the Immediate Past President shall chair the meeting. In the absence of the President and the Immediate Past President of the chapter, the members of the chapter present shall elect a Chairman from any one of the Vice Presidents of the chapter at the meeting. In the event of all the aforesaid persons remaining absent at the meeting, the members present shall elect a member from amongst themselves to act as the Chairman of the meeting.
3.3 Powers-The General Body of the chapter by a majority decision shall revoke any suspension/termination of a member of the chapter. Provided the said member executes his/her right to appeal to the General Body of the chapter by a written requisition to the Secretary of the chapter within 21 days of the aforesaid suspension/ termination. Further, if the member of the chapter fails to execute the aforesaid right to appeal within 21 days of the aforesaid suspension/termination, the member of the chapter loses the aforesaid right to appeal and shall be suspended/terminated from the chapter forthwith. In this case, the Secretary of the chapter shall convene the extra-ordinary General Body meeting of the chapter within 21 days of the receipt of the aforesaid requisition of the aforesaid member.
ARTICLE - 4
ELECTIONS
4.1 Elective Offices - 1 President, 3 Vice Presidents of equal rank, subject to the maximum of 5 Vice Presidents, 1 Secretary, 1 Treasurer and Directors of equal rank in the ratio of 1 Director for every 10 active members, with a minimum strength of 3 Directors, shall be the elective offices of a chapter.
4.2 Qualifications -
An active member of the chapter, with voting rights, can only be a candidate for an elective office of the chapter. No candidate for an elective office of the chapter shall be eligible to contest the elections of the chapter if he/she ages 40 years before the 1st day of January of the year, for which the office has been sought for.
4.3 Nominations -
a) All nominations for an elective office of the chapter shall be made in the form as prescribed under Schedule 1.
b) All nominations for an elective office of the chapter should reach the Chairman of the Nomination Committee of the chapter, in a sealed cover, at least 10 days prior to the date of the election of the elective office. In case, however, insufficient nominations are received for any elective office, the same will be kept open and such nominations can be made on the floor of the election meeting of the chapter. In such cases, the candidates whose nominations have been received within the deadline will be declared elected, provided their nomination form is in order. The election, if it becomes necessary, shall be held for the remaining posts only from among the candidates who had filed the valid nomination during the extended deadline. c) The Immediate Past President of the chapter shall be the Chairman of the Nomination Committee for the annual elections of the chapter. The Chapter Governing Board shall appoint the members on the Nomination Committee. The strength of the Nomination Committee shall not be more than three and shall be in the chronological order of Past Presidents of the chapter, starting from Immediate Past President, subject to their availability. The Nomination Committee shall examine the eligibility and qualification of all the nominations for the elective office of the chapter and shall circulate the list of nominations, with their status, to all the members of the chapter within 3 days of the deadline of the receipt of the said nominations along with the list of active members of the chapter having voting rights. If vacancy arises for any reasons, the President of the chapter shall appoint the Chairman/members of the Nomination Committee from one of the Past Presidents of the chapter, as the case may be. In the case of chapters, who do not have the requisite Past Presidents in their chapter, the Chapter Governing Board shall appoint the Nomination Committee members of the chapter from amongst its members. The Nomination Committee of the chapter shall frame the rules and regulations governing the elections of the chapter without contravening any clause in this Constitution.
4.4 Ballot - The voting shall be by secret ballot. All those candidates getting the highest number of votes shall be declared elected for the office they had sought for. In the event of a tie, the election shall be decided by drawing lots.
ARTICLE - 5
CHAPTER GOVERNING BOARD
5.1 Composition - The Chapter Governing Board shall be comprised of the following members: a) Elected officers as per Article 4.1; b) Immediate Past President; c) Co-opted members.
5.2 Assumption of office - No officer, elected or appointed, shall assume office without the oath of office being administered to him/her. The Chapter Governing Board member shall assume office on the day of their installation at a meeting or the first day of calendar year, whichever is later. The Chapter Governing Board member shall be in office till the installation of the newly elected Chapter Governing Board member or the end of the calendar year, whichever is later.
5.3 Remuneration - All members of the Chapter Governing Board shall serve without any remuneration.
5.4 Conflict of office - No member of the Chapter Governing Board shall hold two elective offices simultaneously.
5.5 Powers -
a) The Chapter Governing Board shall decide the place of the office of the chapter from time to time. b) The Chapter Governing Board shall assign individually the five areas of opportunity to the Vice Presidents as follows: Management; Training; Public Relations; Resources and Business and other assignments among the other members of the Chapter Governing Board.
c) The Chapter Governing Board shall manage, supervise, delegate and appoint any paid staff for conducting the affairs of the Chapter. It shall exercise, on behalf of the Chapter, all such acts or things required for the chapter, which are not covered by the Constitution or other laws binding on the Chapter.
d) The Chapter Governing Board shall execute, implement and carry out the directives as laid down herein in accordance with the objectives and the Constitution of this chapter.
e) The Chapter Governing Board shall meet at least once in a month and shall supervise and review the performance of the members of the Chapter Governing Board and shall decide on bidding for any Zone or National events of JCI India.
f) The Chapter Governing Board shall strictly adhere to all the forms, procedures, rules, systems and other provisions contained in the Constitution and Policy Manual of JCI India.
g) The Chapter Governing Board shall carry out the objects of the Chapter as specified in this Constitution and shall take every step, which may be necessary for the general welfare and conduct of the Chapter. It shall decide to execute, sign, seal, deliver or cause to be executed, signed, sealed and delivered all such arrangements, deeds, documents and assurances as may be necessary to carry out the objects of the chapter.
h) The Chapter Governing Board shall define the duties and responsibilities of its members, if found necessary.
i) The Chapter Governing Board may appoint/suspend/remove, on a permanent or a temporary basis, any staff of the chapter. It shall determine their functions and shall fix their salaries/wages/emoluments.
j) The Chapter Governing Board shall sanction all the expenditures of the chapter, failing which the ratification shall be obtained in the Chapter Governing Board meeting within 30 days of the incurred expenditure.
5.6 Vacancy - A vacancy may occur in the Chapter Governing Board due to death, permanent physical disability, resignation, removal or by any other disposition of a member of the Chapter Governing Board. Any vacancy in the Chapter Governing Board shall be filled up by the remaining members of the Chapter Governing Board, except the office of the President of the chapter, for the unexpired period of the term. However, if the vacancies are more than 1/3rd of the total strength of the Chapter Governing Board, fresh elections shall be held to fill up the vacancies. If a vacancy occurs in the office of the President, the Immediate Past President of the chapter shall function as the President of the chapter for the unexpired period of the term, provided this period is less than six months. If the unexpired period of the term is more than six months, a fresh election for the office of the President of the chapter shall be held within 30 days from the date of the occurrence of the vacancy. This election shall be conducted following the procedures laid down under Article 4 of this Constitution. The Chapter Governing Board may continue to exercise its powers, even if vacancies exist. But, the number of members of the Chapter Governing Board shall not, at any point of time, fall below 2/3rd of its strength.
5.7 Termination -
a) A member of the Chapter Governing Board shall forthwith be terminated from the Chapter Governing Board upon being convicted of a cognizable criminal offence or on being declared as insolvent or on becoming insane.
b) A member of the Chapter Governing Board, who fails to attend any meeting of the Chapter Governing Board without proper explanation of his absence acceptable to the Chapter Governing Board, shall be deemed to have resigned from the Chapter Governing Board.
c) A member of the Chapter Governing Board shall not continue to be a member of the Chapter Governing Board, if he/she has been expelled as a member of their Chapter. Provided further, that a member ceases to be the member of the Chapter Governing Board after the satisfaction of the Chapter Governing Board on the bona fide nature of expulsion of the said member.
d) A member of the Chapter Governing Board, who fails to meet the minimum standards of performance, can be terminated from the Chapter Governing Board by a two-thirds (2/3) majority vote of the total members of the Chapter Governing Board at the meeting of the Chapter Governing Board only.
e) Any member of the Chapter Governing Board, who has committed an act, which is repugnant to the interests and prestige of the organization, can be terminated at a meeting of the Chapter Governing Board, provided that the member concerned shall be given sufficient opportunity of being heard before any action is taken under this provision. Not withstanding anything contained in any other provision of this Constitution, any termination made by the Chapter Governing Board in accordance with the provision of this Article shall be final and binding on all concerned.
f) A member of the Chapter Governing Board shall cease to hold office on their resignation being accepted by the Chapter Governing Board. The Chapter Governing Board shall accept or reject the resignation either at the Chapter Governing Board meeting or through a mail ballot within one month of the receipt of the resignation letter from the concerned member by the Secretary of the chapter, failing which, the resignation shall be deemed to have been accepted by the Chapter Governing Board.
5.8 Meetings -
a) The Chapter Governing Board shall endeavor to meet at least once in every calendar month. The Secretary of the chapter shall convene the meeting of the Chapter Governing Board with a notice of 7 days prior to the convening of such a meeting.
b) The quorum required for any meeting of the Chapter Governing Board is 50% of the members of the Chapter Governing Board strength.
c) Any motion arising out of any meeting of the Chapter Governing Board shall be decided by a majority of votes. In case of equal division of votes, the Chairman shall have a casting vote, provided the Chairman has already voted along with others.
d) A meeting of the Chapter Governing Board could be called at the request of at least one third of the members of the Chapter Governing Board.
e) The President shall chair all the meetings of the Chapter Governing Board. In the event of the President being absent at the meeting of the Chapter Governing Board, the Immediate Past President shall preside over the meeting. If the President and the Immediate Past President are absent at a meeting of the Chapter Governing Board, then the members of the Chapter Governing Board shall elect one of the Vice Presidents to chair the meeting.
5.9 Transfer of Records -
a) It shall be the duty of every officer of the chapter to transfer all their available records of the chapter to their immediate successor or to the Secretary of the chapter at the time of laying down their respective offices.
b) The officer of the chapter failing to transfer the records as required shall be liable for any disciplinary action against him as the Chapter Governing Board may deem necessary in the circumstances of the case.
ARTICLE - 6
FINANCE
6.1 Period - The accounting year of the chapter shall be the Calendar year ending on December 31.
6.2 Budget - The annual budget of the chapter shall be approved by the General Body of the chapter within 45 days of the installation meeting of the chapter and the same shall be circulated to all the members of the chapter within 10 days of the passing of the said budget of the chapter.
6.3 Accounts - All the funds and other assets of the chapter shall be held in the name of the chapter. The funds of the chapter shall be kept in an account with a nationalized bank. The Treasurer and either the President or the Secretary should operate the account jointly. The Treasurer shall maintain the accounts of all the income and expenditure heads on behalf of the Chapter.
6.4 Audit - The accounts of the chapter shall be audited by certified auditor/s appointed at the Annual General Body meeting of the chapter. The Treasurer shall prepare the accounts in the form of Balance Sheet and Income & Expenditure Account of the accounting year last concluded for certification by the auditor/s. The certified copies of the accounts statement shall be forwarded to all the members of the chapter, 15 days prior to the Annual General Body meeting for adoption or at such extended time as the General Body of the chapter may decide. The audited accounts of the previous year duly adopted at the Annual General Body meeting of the chapter shall be sent to the National Secretariat within one month of the said meeting, failing which the President, the Secretary and the Treasurer of the chapter shall be held liable for legal proceedings initiated by JCI India.
ARTICLE - 7
POWERS AND DUTIES OF OFFICERS
7.1 PRESIDENT-
a) He shall preside over all the meetings of the chapter.
b) He shall ensure the adherence of the chapter to all the JCI India policies and objectives and shall protect the Constitution of JCI India and of his/her chapter.
c) He shall supervise the activities of the chapter and shall manage the affairs of the chapter under the advice of the Chapter Governing Board.
d) He shall act as number one Public Relations person of the chapter.
e) He shall represent the chapter in all the other bodies.
f) He shall report to the General Body of the chapter on the actions taken based on the directives of the Constitution, Policy Manual and resolutions of the General Body of the chapter.
g) He shall supervise the administrative personnel of the chapter.
h) He shall call for an emergency meeting of the Chapter Governing Board in exceptional circumstances.
i) He shall present an Annual Report to the Annual General Body meeting of the chapter.
j) He shall be the Chief Delegate at the National Convention, Zone Conference and other meets of the Jaycees representing the chapter. In his absence, he/she shall appoint an active member of the chapter to act as the Alternate Chief Delegate with the approval of the Chapter Governing Board.
7.2 VICE PRESIDENT-
a) He shall discharge such responsibilities as may be assigned by the President from time to time.
b) He shall coordinate the activities and shall report to the President and the Chapter Governing Board on the matters concerning his/her portfolio.
c) He shall function subject to the overall supervision of the President and the Chapter Governing Board.
d) He, who is in charge of the MANAGEMENT PORTFOLIO, shall have under him the following Committees, with LOM management in general: Membership Extension and Consolidation Committee, Internationalism Committee, Ways and Means Committee, Economic Affairs Committee, Records and Recognition Committee.
He shall promote the attendance of the members of the chapter at the Zone Conference, all the Zone Events, National Convention, and other National events of JCI India and shall coordinate the necessary arrangements for the same. He shall also be in charge of coordinating the National and Zone Officer visits to his chapter.
e) He, who is in charge of the TRAINING PORTFOLIO, shall have under him the Leadership Development Committee and the Youth Activities Committee. He shall promote all the Zone level and National level training events amongst the members of the chapter.
f) He, who is in charge of the PROGRAMS PORTFOLIO, shall have under him the following committees: Community Development Committee, Public Relations Committee and the National Program Committee.
g) The above portfolios apart, if the chapter opts to have two more Vice Presidents then: One Vice President shall be in charge of the BUSINESS PORTFOLIO with the Economic Affairs Committee and the Ways & Means Committee under him/her. The other Vice President shall be in charge of the GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT PORTFOLIO with the Membership Extension and Consolidation Committee under him/her.
7.3 SECRETARY-
a) He shall discharge such responsibilities as may be assigned by the President from time to time.
b) He shall coordinate the activities and shall report to the President and the Chapter Governing Board on the matters concerning his/her portfolio.
c) He shall function subject to the overall supervision of the President and the Chapter Governing Board.
d) He shall convene all the meetings of the chapter with due notice to the members of the chapter.
e) He shall be responsible for keeping a permanent record of the minutes of all the meetings of the chapter. The minutes of such meetings, except that of the Chapter Governing Board meeting, shall be open to inspection by the members of the chapter at all the business hours.
f) He shall be responsible for all the internal correspondence of the chapter and shall be in charge of the membership register, attendance register, minutes, books, properties and assets belonging to the chapter.
g) He shall inform the government bodies of the chapter membership profile.
7.4 TREASURER-
a) He shall discharge such responsibilities as may be assigned by the President from time to time.
b) He shall coordinate the activities and shall report to the President and the Chapter Governing Board on the matters concerning his/her portfolio.
c) He shall function subject to the overall supervision of the President and the Chapter Governing Board.
d) He shall be responsible to collect the membership dues from the members of the chapter including issuance of notices to the members of the chapter for the remittance of their dues.
e) He shall deposit in the bank all the cash receipts within 2 days of its receipt by him.
f) He shall be responsible for keeping a permanent record of the books of accounts of the chapter and shall present a report, inclusive of the annual budget, to the Annual General Body meeting of the chapter.
g) He shall present a report on the financial affairs of the chapter to all the Chapter Governing Board meetings.
h) He shall be responsible for all the disbursements and collections of money of the chapter, under the direction of the Chapter Governing Board, and shall be in charge of the bank transactions, account-books, passbooks, chequebooks and all other financial aspects of the chapter.
7.5 Director -
a) He shall discharge such responsibilities as may be assigned by the President and the Vice President from time to time.
b) He shall function subject to the overall supervision of the President, Vice President and the Chapter Governing Board.
c) He shall be assigned with a Committee, as found in Article 7.2, and shall present the recommendations to the Chapter Governing Board.
d) He shall promote, co-ordinate and supervise the local activities, within the terms of reference of the assigned committee, and shall be responsible for the implementation of the projects of the chapter.
ARTICLE - 8
PROTOCOL
In any regular meeting of the chapter: the President, the Immediate Past President and the Secretary shall occupy the seats on the dais. In any public function conducted by the chapter: the President, the Immediate Past President and the Secretary of the chapter, the present or past JCI India officers/invited dignitaries and the concerned Project Chairman shall occupy the seats on the dais.
ARTICLE - 9
GENERAL
9.1 Portfolio - The activities of the chapter shall be grouped into three portfolios: (i) Management, (ii) Training (iii) Programs. The chapter can have additional two portfolios: (i) Business and (ii) Growth & Development.
9.2 Rules of Procedure - The business of the chapter shall be conducted according to its Constitution and Policy Manual and where otherwise not provided, the Robert's Rules of Order (latest version) shall govern it.
9.3 Amendments - This Constitution may be amended by 3/4th majority of votes of the members at a General Body meeting of the chapter, provided the proposed amendments were circulated to all the members of the chapter at least seven days of the aforesaid meeting. Further, any amendment shall not be in variance of the Constitution and Policy Manuals of JCI India.
9.4 Legal -
a) The chapter shall sue and be sued only in the name of its President.
b) No member of the chapter shall be entitled to go to any court of law or to commence any proceeding in connection with the activities of the chapter, without exhausting the remedies as provided in this Constitution.
c) All matters in dispute between the members of the chapter and all disputes arising out of or in relation thereto shall be referred to Arbitration by a Tribunal of Arbitration to be selected by the Chapter Governing Board. The chapter and or otherwise its members shall be bound by the decision of the above Tribunal of Arbitration. The decision of the above Tribunal of Arbitration shall be final.
d) Any committee appointed by the General Body for the purpose or, in the absence of any such committee, the Chapter Governing Board shall be entitled to frame laws or byelaws relating to the procedure of the Tribunal of Arbitration to any matter arising out of such disputes. In case, no such laws or byelaws are framed, the Tribunal of Arbitration shall be entitled to frame its own procedures.
e) In the event of disputes and/or differences arising between a member and a chapter or between the chapter and another chapter, the same shall be dealt with as found in Article 9.3 of the Constitution of JCI India.
9.5 Waiver - Any article of this Constitution may be waived by a unanimous vote of the General Body of the chapter provided that 4/5th of the total members of the chapter are present and have participated in the above vote. Provided further, the waiver should not be in variance of the procedures as laid down in the Constitution and Policy Manuals of JCI India.
9.6 Dissolution -
a) The chapter (this society) may be dissolved if 3/4th of all the active members of the chapter decide for such dissolution by being present at the General Body meeting of the chapter convened specifically for this purpose. If upon the dissolution of the chapter, after satisfaction of all its debts and liabilities, any assets whatever, the same shall not be paid to or shall be distributed among the members of the chapter, but shall be donated to JCI India, which has the similar objectives of this society. The society shall be dissolved as per provisions laid down under Article 10 and 11 of the Societies Registration Act, 1860.
b) If upon the dissolution of the chapter (this society) or if upon the disaffiliation of the chapter (this society) by JCI India, any assets whatever, the same shall not be paid to or shall be distributed among the members of the chapter, but shall be donated to JCI India, which has the similar objectives of this society.



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